Exposed.

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This late morning, I was on a comfortably-packed train, wondering if I should drop by the poke bowl shop to pick up lunch before heading for the office. I had a small craving for it, but not enough to rule out a simple sandwich, or a bowl of noodles, completely.

Lost in thought over my first-world problem, my idle fingers found the folder of film-taken pictures on my phone. I should post something on the blog, I thought above my lunch thoughts.

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I flipped through pictures of my Italy holiday, my multiple Taiwan escapades, and weekend walks, pleased to see them again. Then my finger hit a folder of experimental double-exposed (and somewhat failed) photos. I had connected with a stranger on the other side of the world for this little project, and for my part, I wandered into the streets off East Coast Road to complete it.

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But as I looked at these photos, it wasn’t the stranger I thought of. Or the streets I could no longer name. Or the reason why I couldn’t take a proper double-exposed photo. My thoughts strayed onto the companion who’s absent, yet undeniably present in all the photos.

Strange how life could change the course of a friendship, how archives and archives of fond memories were not enough to keep it together. Not nearly enough.

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Then the overhead sound system announced my stop. I barely heard it, but my body has learnt the routine, and I stepped out to join the rest of the working crowd.

Birthdays and wishes

I am one of those people who remember birthdays without having to rely on social calendars too much. But I am also one of those people who rarely send a birthday card (and gift) in time.

Then I saw the cutest The New Yorker online cards on the beautifully-curated Paperless Post. I am such a fan of its art and humor (although I have to say that works of Ashkahn, Mr Boddingtons Studio , Felix Doolittle, Happy Menocal, and Kate Spade – just to name a few of my favourites on the site – were strong contenders).

So I wrote my friend a simple birthday message, inserted into an e-envelope holding a The New Yorker card, against a customised gold polka-dotted backdrop – all in 5 mins (excluding the time taken to actually decide which card to go with) and more importantly, in time for her birthday. I hope it perks up her morning when she sees it.

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This post was done in partnership with Paperless Post.